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Big Ones

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$4.64

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Average Rating
★★★★½
(160 Reviews)

Metal Album Reviews[RSS]

  • The videos on this tape are: Deuces are Wild, Livin on the Edge, Eat the Rich, Amazing, Cryin, Crazy, Rag Doll, Angel, What it Takes, Love in an Elevator, Janies got a Gun, The Other Side, and Dude looks like a Lady. There is also a few minutes intro to each video showing the making of the video, or some promotional spots they have done in other countries, or an ad for Rock the Vote, and some short interview footage.It is high quality, and is about 90 minutes long. I cannot wait for their next VHS to be released… would love to have Pink, Jaded, and all their other ‘new’ stuff on tape as well. Highly recommended.

    Posted on December 27, 2009 - Permalink - Buy Now
  • I think this is one of the best music videos I’ve ever seen. It has their best from ‘87-’93. Here’s the lowdown for people who don’t know what’s here: 3 hits from “Permanent Vacation”, 4 hits from “Pump”, 5 hits from “Get A Grip”, plus a special video made for the collection for “Deuces Are Wild” from “Beavis & Butthead Experience” CD. I can’t wait ’til Geffen gets off their a** and puts this collection on DVD. The downside to the collection is it don’t have the (bar)video version of “What It Takes”, “Walk On Water”, or “Blind Man” with Pamela Anderson playing the nurse.

    Posted on December 27, 2009 - Permalink - Buy Now
  • Aerosmith already had done Greatest Hits releases, but Big Ones in 1994 caught them up with some of their latest tunes. How much you like this CD depends on how much you liked the band’s music in that era. Some people thought it was great. Others hated any change from the raw-rocking sounds of the “younger Aerosmith” back in the 70s.

    I have to admit that while I really love the Aerosmith of the 70s, I also thought that the Aerosmith of the 80s-90s was fantastic as well. Bands all change. You can look at most bands (let’s say the Beatles) and track how their music evolved and changed as the band members themselves grew and matured. It seems unfair to me for any observer to say to a band, “You should keep playing the same way the rest of your life, because I enjoy it”.

    Start with “Love in an Elevator”. I *love* that song! It’s not full of deep meaning, it’s not full of angst. It’s bursting with great, lustful energy. Surely all of us have had that hormone-driven rush, where we just want to grab our partner in an elevator and have some fun! I love the rhythms, too.

    Move on to “Rag Doll”. Another song I love. She’s a hot ticket, “never see ya leaving by the back door”. Another great song for dancing around the living room to, enjoying life. Go right into “Dude Looks Like a Lady”. I think this song is hilarious! C’mon, can anyone who listens to songs like “Octopus’s Secret Garden” start to complain that all songs must be serious? Or do people who don’t like Dude also frown on other “non serious” songs?

    We get some serious songs in here, if that’s what you’re into. “Janie’s Got a Gun” won a lot of acclaim when it was released, for addressing the pain and torment felt by sexually abused kids. That’s not something you find in most rocker’s music collections.

    I really appreciate all the songs in this collection. Are they as great as “Dream On”? I really find it’s hard to compare songs like that. Dream On was an epic song about reaching your goals. Janie’s Got a Gun was a serious look into a tragic situation. Surely both can exist in the world and be meaningful in their own way.

    Some critics love to bash this CD as being all inferior work. I really have to say, it depends on how open your mind is about music. If you have only a certain style of song you enjoy, and this isn’t it, then you won’t enjoy it. If you’re open to a range, which includes both social commentary and poppy-dancing-fun, then you might be very pleasantly surprised with what you get here. I can only say that I really enjoy listening to this CD.

    Posted on December 27, 2009 - Permalink - Buy Now
  • Um, is anyone else confused here? People talk about the “new” Aerosmith as being a ballad band and glossy, shiny pop. I’ve listened… and listened…. and listened. What I hear is the gritty hard rock band of the 70s with a *somewhat* greater emphasis on ballads, and on some songs a *somewhat* more polished feel. Some seem to find this reason to damn Aerosmith to everlasting hell. I don’t. But to my ears I cna’t honestly say that the “old” and “new” Aersomtih are really all that different. I bought Permamant Vacation when it first came put in 1987 and I never thought it was that different from their 70s material. Haven’t Aerosmith always done ballads? And isn’t Uncle Salty kind of “poppy”?(Who cares, the song’s great anyway!)If anyone else is confused about the supposed existence of the evil “teenybopper” Doppelganger of the new Aerosmith, please click “yes” below. I personally like all Aerosmith phases. And this time at least, I like the Amazon review!

    Posted on December 27, 2009 - Permalink - Buy Now
  • First of all, if you are looking for the BEST compilation of Aerosmith’s “second coming” (the Geffen years, 1985-1994), then I would recommend the two-disc “Anthology” (2001), which includes all the songs here, digitally remastered, and some other good tunes that did not make the hit lists. If you want to go further into that era, I would then recommend “Permanent Vacation” (1987) and “Pump” (1989).Second, if you are a passing fan looking for the BEST compilation of ALL of Aerosmith’s music, I would recommend the newly-released “Oh . . .”, which contains many of these songs remastered, the early classics (“Dream On”, “Walk This Way”, “Sweet Emotion”, etc.), and hits from the records that were released after this compilation (“Don’t Want to Miss a Thing”, “Falling in Love”, “Pink”, “Jaded”, etc.)

    Posted on December 27, 2009 - Permalink - Buy Now