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Led Zeppelin - The Song Remains the Same [Blu-ray]

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Reviews

Average Rating
★★★★☆
(152 Reviews)

Metal Album Reviews[RSS]

  • First of all the 5 stars is for Zep & the great music but collectors ofmini lp replicas take note:All the Zep albums(Bar BBC) have beenreleased on mini lp paper sleeve versionsBOTH from Japan AND Europe.The europe & Jap versions are sonically identical,all are taken from the Jimmy Page George Marinoremasters,a fact also printed on the stickers(Europereleases)& insert sheet (Japan releases).The packaging is also identical,the europe releasesactually use the Jap outer cardboard sleeves(the catalognumbers on the europe spines are identical to theirJapanese counterparts but the numbers are differenton the actual discs (europe) themselves.The Japan versions DO have an extra foldout lyricinsert in Japanese,the discs are housed in see through thin plastic sleeves(the europe versions are enclosed in glossycard inner sleeves,much nicer).Most importantly the EAU versions are MUCH cheaper,if you must have the paper insertand the obi strip,be prepared to pay heavily.All in its great to have these available but in a nutshellthe European versions are almost identical bar the paper insert at a much lower price(amazon.co.uk)

    Posted on December 30, 2009 - Permalink - Buy Now
  • This film/album had actually been shelved in 1973, never intended to be released because of what was perceived by the band to be a mediocre performance. It only saw the light of day because of a decision that the band needed to fill a void of 18 months due to Robert Plant’s personal problems (he suffered a badly fractured leg in an auto accident and it was feared that he would never walk again without a cane). First of all, The Song Remains the Same was out of date – the film was shot well before the release of the band’s monumental Physical Graffiti album and, obviously, contained none of that album’s material. Secondly, the band members themselves lament to this very day that this was their only live performance officially captured for posterity. They were at the end of an extensive American tour at the time and were understandably exhausted. Circumstances prevented Zeppelin from ever producing the definitive live recording that they so desperately desired. Such a project was slated for the band’s ‘80-’81 tour, but was obviously scrapped by the death of John Bonham.It’s best to think of The Song Remains the Same more as a historical peice than as the definitive live Led Zeppelin, which it is not. It captures a moment in time. An inside-glimpse at the larger-than-life Led Zeppelin, complete with their flaws (even Zep was not perfect). And in that way, The Song Remains the Same is actually more intriguing and has more of an enduring charm than some pristine, studio-exact live excercise.But don’t be deceived into thinking that this album is slop. There are certainly moments of grandeur here that other bands would kill for on their best day. Page’s guitar blitz on “Celebration Day” obliterates the studio version. That breathtaking final solo provides fresh open-mouthed astonishment every time. Of course, any time Zeppelin straps it on for “Dazed and Confused”, it’s an adventure – although the running time here of nearly 27 minutes is shockingly self-indulgent for a live album, especially considering the wealth of material they had to draw from (believe it or not, they were known to go even LONGER in their early days). And who could fail to mention the most famous improvised line ever in a live recording, Robert Plant’s, “Does anybody remember laughter?” during “Stairway…” – so well known in fact, that many people think it’s part of the studio version.Taking the good with the bad, The Song Remains the Same soundtrack is an essential momento for any Zep fan, while it should perhaps be left until later for Zep novices (at the very least, get 2 or 3 of the first 6 studio albums before you jump into this).

    Posted on December 30, 2009 - Permalink - Buy Now
  • I cannot for the life of me figure out why so many Zep-heads (and Page and Plant too) dismiss this 1973 concert album as sub-standard. Granted, it is heavily edited, with the best moments of three consecutive nights spliced together for the final mix. But then, in reality aren’t all official live recordings put together this way? And there is no doubt that what we are left with is definitive concert versions of these nine songs. Page delivers two of his finest ever solos in ‘No Quarter’ and ‘Stairway to Heaven,’ while his chord/lead work on the title track is simply astounding. Similarly, the violin bow solo in ‘Dazed and Confused’ and the rockabilly solos in ‘Whole Lotta Love’ are masterful. Also, Plant is in fine voice throughout, and the rhythm section of Jones and Bonham is frighteningly intense. In my view, 1973 was Zep’s greatest year as a live band – it marked the peak of their early instrumental development (check out bootlegs of the Mobile and Seattle shows from this same US tour for comparable performances). And this album captures that peak-1973 period for official posterity. So forget what the ‘politically correct’ Zep critics say – this is one of rock’s great live albums!

    Posted on December 30, 2009 - Permalink - Buy Now
  • Finally after many years of disappointment with this concert film, Page has set the record straight…He took over the controls and the result is a brand new Zep concert movie! The Blu Ray sound is great (MY BIGGEST COMPLAINT ABOUT THIS FILM SINCE IT WAS IN THE THEATERS) 5.1 mixed correctly. (for a change, not all the sound comes from the center channel, its mixed beautifully). There are very cool new stage edits not, for some reason, in the original cut. It was actually shot very well, just edited poorly (the original cut) Now I can safely say it is one of the best concerts film outs there! The ‘fantasy’ sequences are still dumb, but it was a sign of the times…You see why, if you never saw them, why they are still so popular!

    Posted on December 30, 2009 - Permalink - Buy Now
  • Unfortunately the Blu-ray version of this concert has a 7-second long sound dropout in the TrueHD soundtrack at timecode 1:40:45 – all copies of the Blu-ray currently available are affected. The TrueHD soundtrack of the previously released HD DVD does not suffer from this dropout (nor does the Blu-ray’s lower quality DD soundtrack), so it is clear this was an encoding goof-up on Warner’s part.

    This type of QC problem is unacceptable for a product that costs $20, yet Warner has not mentioned any intention of fixing the issue. Hopefully they get on the ball and set up a replacement program for those who buy this defective disc.

    Note that the recent re-release of this disc still suffers from the dropout problem. Maybe the third time will be the charm… :

    Posted on December 30, 2009 - Permalink - Buy Now