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Practice What You Preach

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Reviews

Average Rating
★★★★½
(48 Reviews)

Testament Biography - Testament Discography - All Heavy Metal Bands

Features

  • With a Rick Rubin produced new album expected in 2007, the band s first in four years, Metallica churns the waters with its first-ever musicvideo retrospective. Featuring 21 videos and bonus features, spanning the album years 1989 to 2004, from And Justice For All to St. Anger, the collection showcases hard rock s greatest band. Ranked eighth on the list of the biggest selling groups in history, a

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No Description AvailableNo Track Information AvailableMedia Type: CDArtist: TESTAMENTTitle: PRACTICE WHAT YOU PREACHStreet Release Date: 08/08/1989<Domestic or Import: DomesticGenre: HEAVY METAL

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  • Testament was lumped in with all the Metallica “wanna-be”s back in the mid-to-late 80s, which was unfortunate, because this album resembled Metallica only in the sense that it was thrash metal. This album stands up just fine on its own, and comparisons to Master of Puppets are just unnecessary. The sounds are very different, from the bass guitar to the drums, to Chuck Billy’s vocals.The standout tracks on this album, for me, are: “Practice What You Preach,” “Perilous Nation” (which has a nifty, jazzy little outro), “Sins of Omission” (an awesome, frantic thrash song), “The Ballad” (a nice acoutic bit that builds up to a great heavy ending), and “Nightmare (Coming Back to You)” (a blast of thrash).The guitars, while generally going for that coveted late-80s “heaviest of metal” (insert sign of the devil here) sound, always maintain a subconsciously jazzy edge and Chuck Billy’s voice is a nice compliment to them. The only thing I might have ever had a tiny gripe about was the “clickety”-ness of the kick drums. It would have been nice to put a little bass in there.Overall, though, Practice What You Preach belongs on the shelf next to Master of Puppets, Peace Sells…but Who’s Buying?, and Among the Living as some of great early thrash albums.Get it if ya ain’t got it!

    Posted on December 28, 2009 - Permalink - Buy Now
  • This album kept me sane 15 years ago as I attended High School. I spent an entire year with this tape stuck in my walkman. As I listen to it now, I’m still in awe of its power.

    At Thrash Metal’s peak, when bands moved past the fastest-riff-ever and gothic tones to more meaningful topics and much more mature music, PWYP stands out in a small cluster of releases by an even smaller cluster of artists that to me, truly defined the power of the music and the message it could convey. I miss those days.

    Posted on December 28, 2009 - Permalink - Buy Now
  • THIS IS MY FAVOURITE ALBUM WITH TESTAMENT ..CLASSIC OLD TRASH WITH MELODIC TUNES :THIS RECORD IS ONE OF THE ALBUMS THAT YOU MUST HAVE IF YOU ARE INTO TRASH :::SOME PEOPLE SAYS THAT THEIR FIRST ALBUM IS THE BEST BUT THEY ARE TOTALLY WRONG.. ITS EVEN BETTER THAN THE NEW ORDER ALBUM …THE BEST TRACKS ON THIS ALBUM IS SINS OF.. AND THE TITLETRACK …BUY THIS RECORD TODAY AND YOU WILL GET A NEW FAVOURITE IN YOUR RECORD COLLECTION

    Posted on December 28, 2009 - Permalink - Buy Now
  • Testament may not have invented thrash metal, but they are still a very underrated band. The musicians in Testament are equally as talented as anybody in thrash’s Big Four bands (Metallica, Megadeth, Slayer, and Anthrax), and they are more hook oriented than many speed metal bands. Lead guitarist Alex Skolnick’s solos are a lot more technical than Slayer’s, and are usually every bit as breathtaking as Metallica’s. The guitar shredding on Testament’s third studio album, “Practice What You Preach” (which was released in 1989), is, of course, no exception. Even when the rest of the band (especially the drummer) sounds somewhat generic, Skolnick soars on every track with fiery, blowtorch riffs and wonderful solos. “Time Is Coming” and the title track are both catchy numbers with chugging riffs, thumping drums, and vocals which almost echo James Hatfield (plus “Practice What You Preach” has a shout a long of “preach!” in the chorus.) These songs are also both capped off by a lengthy, wailing guitar solo. Likewise, “Perilous Nation” features up and down, classical-sounding guitar work, “Envy Life” has an ascending solo, and “Sins of Omission” is highlighted by another superb, very complex solo which has several different parts to it. Other standout tracks include “The Ballad” and the instrumental (albeit brief) album closer, “Confusion Fusion.” The former track, “The Ballad,” kind of sounds like Metallica’s 1986 single, “Welcome Home (Sanitarium),” because it begins as a power ballad with acoustic plunking, but it gradually builds and gains momentum. Over the years, this album has taken a slight dip in sound quality, but it has aged better than some of the music from the Eighties. Testament may not be as iconic as some thrash bands, but albums like “Practice What You Preach” prove that they definitely should be. This is another great, must-own album from one of thrash’s most important, most underrated, and finest bands.

    Posted on December 28, 2009 - Permalink - Buy Now
  • Right from the outset of the title track, “Practice What You Preach” is some roaringly infectious old school thrash. With lots of ripping riffs, Chuck Billy’s unmistakable howl, and just enough use of melody to please the ear, this is doubtless one of the underappreciated gems of the thrash era. With the exception of the aptly titled “The Ballad,” the album never deviates from its formula of energetic, fist-pumping metal, with some top notch musicianship to boot; you especially have to love Alex Skolnick’s blazing solos. I’m not going to bother citing specific songs, as they’re all excellent and I don’t care for song-by-song reviews anyway. In conclusion, BUY BUY BUY!

    Posted on December 28, 2009 - Permalink - Buy Now