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Psychotic Supper

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Reviews

Average Rating
★★★★½
(21 Reviews)

Tesla Biography - Tesla Discography - All Heavy Metal Bands

Description

Japanese only SHM paper sleeve pressing. The SHM-CD [Super High Material CD] format features enhanced audio quality through the use of a special polycarbonate plastic. Using a process developed by JVC and Universal Music Japan discovered through the joint companies’ research into LCD display manufacturing* SHM-CDs feature improved transparency on the data side of the disc* allowing for more accurate reading of CD data by the CD player laser head. SHM-CD format CDs are fully compatible with standard CD players.A little too edgy to be considered pop metal, Tesla were probably the least pretentious band of the genre. On Psychotic Supper, they focus on understated, bluesy hard rock, with an occasional acoustic guitar thrown in for variety. The result is well worth a listen, and this album contains some of their best material, including the anthemic ”Edison’s Medicine” and the no-bull ”Call It What You Want.” ”What You Give” is a lovely, tender alternative to the syrupy power ballads that so many hard rock bands indulged in during the late ’80s and early ’90s. ”Song & Emotion,” another slow song, is a tribute to the late Steve Clark of Def Leppard. Tesla’s favorite themes are evident on songs like ”Change in the Weather,” ”Don’t De-Rock Me,” and ”Freedom Slaves,” but ”Toke About It” shows that they also retained their sense of humor. –Genevieve Williams

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Metal Album Reviews[RSS]

  • I own ALL of Tesla’s stuff, bought when it came out ( Mechanical Resonance and Great Radio Controversy on VINYL for crying out loud!), and I think this is their best. Granted, it’s tough to choose a best from a band with this kind of TALENT (they have NO PEERS), but after about a million listens I have to go with Psychotic Supper; yes, it rocks even harder than Mech Resonance. These guys are freakin’ ARTISTS. I saw there was only 1 review for this CD; that’s SAD. Wake up, people!! All Tesla’s stuff gets 5++ stars. Serious guitar work, here. If you dig Tesla, check out Badlands 1st CD; they are the only other band I know of that even approaches the talent of Tesla. Buy the CD, you CAN’T go wrong!

    Posted on January 18, 2010 - Permalink - Buy Now
  • From time to time, a hard rock act will step up to the plate with a flair and style that is undeniably different. In the mid-80’s thru the early 90’s though, bands could be thrown into two piles-Metal/Hair or Grunge/Garage. Amidst this time frame, Tesla emerged with a brand of rock that not only did’nt go into the heap, but it epitomized what good, hard rock-n-roll should sound like in my opinion. If choosing a Tesla cd, I would pick Psychotic Supper, as it showcases the energy & flavor of the group true to form. If you crave unique rock with original hooks, you won’t be disappointed. This ensemble leaves your blood tingling. And though they were surprisingly underated, (critics needed hearing aids) they rocked like no band did in 1991. And, uh-hum, like NO band does now.

    Posted on January 17, 2010 - Permalink - Buy Now
  • I have all of Tesla’s cds and love them all. This one has some songs that really hold the sound that they are known for though. “What you give” is my personal favorite. I highly recommend this cd.

    Posted on January 17, 2010 - Permalink - Buy Now
  • I was surprised by this album. Tesla had always been rockers, but one listen to the song Edison’s Medicine proved these guys could really shred. Fans of great riff-based rock will love this album, fans of their song Love song will love What You Give, & any Def Leppard fan will appreciate the tribute to late Lep guitarist Steve Clark, Song & Emotion, basing the opening riff on Clark’s original intro to Gods Of War. All in all, this ia a great album. Check out the other albums, too.

    Posted on January 17, 2010 - Permalink - Buy Now
  • I can’t believe that I am only the fifth person to review this classic early 1990s hard rock album. Before this release, Tesla had already gotten pretty big with their sophomore effort and the live unplugged album, each of which yielded a top 10 hit. By the time this came out in the fall of 1991, the rock music landscape was beginning to change (i.e., away from melodic hard rock and toward unmelodic, whiny grunge). Still, this album held its own at the time with several rock radio hits.”Edison’s Medicine” is a very catchy rocker, and “Call It What You Want” is a fantastic, anthemic follow up. “What You Give” is over 7 minutes long–an amazing acoustic anthem/ballad that rivals the more well-known “Love Song” in terms of its musicianship. “Song And Emotion” is another slower track that is a touching tribute to Def Leppard’s Steve Clark, who had died earlier that same year. I remember hearing all these songs frequently on rock radio at the time this album was out.Other highlights include the catchy, heavy “Don’t De-Rock Me”, with an extended guitar solo and even a drum solo; the stirring (both musically and lyrically) “Freedom Slaves”, which is a hard, anthemic rocker; and the amusing closing track, “Toke About It”. Truth is, there is not a bad track here. It is an album full of hard rock highlights.The band has called this their favorite album, so be sure to pick this up if you were ever a fan of Tesla and somehow missed out on this one. This is classic hard rock at its best. Even if you did not like the “pop metal” of the ’80s, you very well may appreciate the straight-ahead, hard rocking quality presented here. Pop metal fans will appreciate this as well. Like all Tesla albums, a strongly recommended buy.

    Posted on January 17, 2010 - Permalink - Buy Now