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The Return of the Boogie Men

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★★★★☆
(9 Reviews)

Foghat Biography - Foghat Discography - All Heavy Metal Bands

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Pat Benatar practically invented female empowerment in rock, so it’s a good to see she is back with her 17th album. Produced by her guitarist husband Neil Giraldo, Go shows that Benatar hasn’t lost any of her swagger or punch. She’s still the mistress of the emotional watershed as she pinpoints the precise moment when a long-suffering protagonist implodes and decides she will no longer be a victim of love. The kinetic and lyrical power released during those exchanges is still staggering, and songs like ”I Won’t” and ”Go” visit the same teeth-gnashing terrain as ”Love is a Battlefield,” and ”Hit Me with Your Best Shot.” The only times she stumbles out of her stilettos is when she shows a softer side on the regretful ”Sorry,” which finds her splendidly ragged voice drowned in a sea of limpid Spanish guitars, and the Motown-esque ”Please Don’t Leave Me.” But for most of the disc, Benatar is a hard-glittering rock gem who still can rage with the best of them. –Jaan Uhelszki

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  • Foghat broke up as a recording unit after the “Zig Zag Walk” album in the early 80’s. As a touring act various versions of Foghat continued to perform live throughout the next decade. At one point there were two touring versions of the band competing against each other each with just one original member. In 1994 the dream of many Foghat fans came to a reality when the original four members, Lonesome Dave Peverett, Rod Price, Tony Stevens, and Roger Earl decided to bury their differences and get back together. The result was this, the band’s first new album of studio material in more than a decade. The album is mostly new, but does contain newly recorded acoustic versions of the Foghat staples “I Just Want To Make Love To You”, and “Take Me To The River”. Foghat has always been blues based and they really let their blues roots show on tracks like “Louisiana Blues”. Other highlights include “Jump That Train”, “Talk To Me Baby”, “Writing On The Wall”, and “Motel Shaker”. This really is a very good comeback album and I would say ranks up with their better earlier studio output. It may not be quite as good as “Fool For The City” or “Stone Blue”, but this is a solid effort finding the band in fine form. Unfortunately this would be the last studio disc from the original band. Both Dave Peverett and Rod Price have passed away. There is still a version of Foghat out there with Roger Earl, but sadly the original quartet is gone for good.

    Posted on February 1, 2010 - Permalink - Buy Now
  • Foghat covers themselves with arrangements that deliberately expose their long career of homage to the blues. I have every album they have made, and the hard driving rock explodes in joy – they are the tightest band I have ever seen in person. This album is packed with the pure and simple essence of blues music – uncolored, just plain un-colored. This is the real story of Foghat.

    Posted on February 1, 2010 - Permalink - Buy Now
  • This is Foghat at their very best. This may be their best album ever. Foghat was always a blues-based band, and their albums up through “Stone Blue” really reflect that. After “Stone Blue” they seemed to really lose focus. They starting dabbling in other sounds, rockabilly and some other stuff that I found very disappointing. Eventually, they just kind of disappeared from the scene for several decades.This album is their comeback album – after somewhere around 25 years of being missing in action, Foghat is back and better than ever. This is a great blues/rock album. Check out “Jump That Train”, “Nothin’ But Trouble”, and “Talk To Me Baby”. Listen to the slide guitar on “Jump That Train” – there’s a lot of it there, as you would expect from classic Foghat. Listen to the slide bass guitar on “Nothin’ But Trouble” – another sign of classic Foghat. Great stuff! If you like Foghat, you’ll love this album.

    Posted on February 1, 2010 - Permalink - Buy Now
  • Play Dirty and Nothin’ But Trouble alone make this CD worth the investment. Crank ‘em loud! Also has a great rendition of I Just Want To Make Love To You that is unexpected. An overall super effort after several lackluster attempts.

    Posted on February 1, 2010 - Permalink - Buy Now
  • This is Foghat at their very best. This may be their best album ever. Foghat was always a blues-based band, and their albums up through “Stone Blue” really reflect that. After “Stone Blue” they seemed to really lose focus. They starting dabbling in other sounds, rockabilly and some other stuff that I found very disappointing. Eventually, they just kind of disappeared from the scene for several decades.This album is their comeback album – after somewhere around 25 years of being missing in action, Foghat is back and as good or better than ever. This is a great blues/rock album. Check out “Jump That Train”, “Motel Shaker”, “Nothin’ But Trouble”, and “Talk To Me Baby”. There’s some acoustic stuff on this album too, and it’s good, but I like the electric stuff the best. If you like Foghat, you’ll love this album!Check out

    Posted on January 31, 2010 - Permalink - Buy Now